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Lucky Cat Vegan: a plant-based virtual restaurant sprouts in Texas

As a trained dietitian and recent convert to vegetarianism, Navin Hariprasad launched a virtual restaurant to start offering vegan cuisine, meeting the demand for more plant-based options.

On the menu

Healthy meals you can’t tell are vegan

Footprint

1 virtual restaurant in Dallas

Delivery Goal

Serve an unmet demand for plant-based options

Starting out with one lucky cat

After adopting a vegetarian lifestyle for his own health reasons, Navin Hariprasad, the executive chef and owner of Spice in the City, found a limited selection of plant-based dining options with great flavor in Dallas, Texas.

So when Uber Eats approached Navin about launching a delivery-focused virtual restaurant out of his current Indian-Tex-Mex fusion brick-and-mortar, he was all in.

A week before that kismet encounter, Navin purchased a lucky cat figurine at a vintage store. Thinking it would make a catchy name, Lucky Cat Vegan was born.

Uncovering cuisine gaps with Uber Eats insights

For Lucky Cat’s new customers, while stumbling upon an amazing vegan option might seem like pure luck, the restaurant’s concept was actually backed by analytics.

Navin was armed with Uber Eats insights revealing top searches within a five-mile radius of Spice in the City included “vegan” and “vegetarian”. Putting his culinary talents and entrepreneurial drive to work, he brought Lucky Cat Vegan to life in two weeks.

“Being one of the first virtual restaurants in Dallas on Uber Eats is incredible,” says Navin. “Having the ability to open up a new concept without having to build a whole restaurant and staff it from scratch, has definitely made me passionate about Lucky Cat as a concept.”

“A virtual restaurant can provide a whole new option without having to worry about all the overhead and additional staffing. What a blessing!”

Virtual restaurants empowering entrepreneurs

Passionate about his dreams and his food, Navin wanted to expand quickly. “Opening a virtual restaurant is the way to go,” says Navin, “they help restaurants expand their businesses with minimal risk.”*

Launching a virtual restaurant with new cuisine inspired him to get back in the kitchen and out of his comfort zone.

It’s also helped him provide more hours to his current staff and give the local community delicious, plant-based cuisine, which the neighborhood previously lacked. Navin says he loves working with Uber Eats because it gives him the ability to market his virtual and brick-and-mortar restaurants to consumers in the area.

*As compared to opening an entirely new brick and mortar restaurant.